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Benefits training evaluation surveys deliver

Benefits training evaluation surveys deliver

1) Increase your employees’ ability to retain more knowledge:

If there are training courses that you frequently send new company employees on, you’ll want them and your business to gain as much value as possible. Creating a quiz is a great way to test employees on what they learnt, they’ll also be more likely to revisit their course materials if you run regular quizzes which in turn helps them to retain more knowledge. This also helps encourage employees to think about how they can apply their new found knowledge to their job.

2) Improve how this knowledge is applied and shared across your business:

You can also use quizzes to evaluate how well employees have been able to apply their newly found knowledge in their everyday roles and if they’ve been able to pass this onto other colleagues in the business. Publishing quiz scores and offering prizes for the highest, can help encourage greater employee participation and a healthy competition among staff which can help boost productivity within your business.

3) Enhance the quality of any training you provide:

Improve the quality of your course trainers, teaching methods and any materials you use, through evaluation surveys that allow you to test the effectiveness of a training course and enable participants to anonymously offer their feedback.

4) Increase the satisfaction and number of your course attendees:

By regularly and consistently evaluating your course attendees and acting on the feedback they provide, not only will this help to increase their satisfaction with the training you provide, it will help you to improve the quality of your course and attract more attendees going forward.

5) Identify opportunities to introduce new courses:

By allowing you to see areas where participants may be struggling, or reveal patterns in your feedback, where attendees may be asking for more information in the same areas, it can enable you to identify areas where follow up training is required. It can also highlight where there is demand for you to potentially develop new courses.

6) Improve career development for employees:

Training evaluation surveys can also be useful in helping you to develop employees, by improving your understanding of their strengths and weaknesses. Not only can it help you to keep track of their progress in their roles, it can also reveal whether they can still grow in their current jobs or whether they may be more successful in another position.

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How can you evaluate external training providers?

How can you evaluate external training providers?

It’s reckoned that over 25% of the external training that companies provide for their staff fall far short of meeting their needs. So how can directors ensure it will work effectively and that it’s money well spent?

Not a cheap option

In a recent survey by Knowledgepool, more than 25% of employees questioned felt that the external training courses they had attended via work had little or no relevance to their job role. Many claimed to be none the wiser after sitting through them, meaning that the company’s cash was well and truly wasted.

Before you pay?

Many training courses aren’t cheap, and so you won’t want one of your employees to be amongst this worrying statistic. But you’ve a one in four chance that they will be. So is there any way to evaluate the effectiveness of a training provider both before and after you book places on one of their courses?

Ask your own staff

It sounds obvious, but don’t just send a member of staff on a course (unless you have to for, e.g., manual handling). Before you do, ask them about what they feel they need and show them any you have selected. If they feel the course is pitched too high, or low, for their level, request more detailed course content from the provider.

Tip 1. Following most training courses, attendees are invited to fill in feedback, or evaluation forms. There’s no reason why you can’t ask the provider to see a range of these comments – good and bad.

Tip 2. If they’re reluctant to release any (they can easily block out the names, address etc. to protect confidentiality) or provide you with a sample of recent reviews, there’s a reason for it and it’s unlikely to be a good one.

Business is booming

Following training, you should be able to measure its success using tangible indicators. For example, if the training was for Customer Service, you should be able to see for yourself how an employee is now interacting with customers. If it was on technical skills, e.g. IT, ask them to demonstrate something new that they learned about on their course.

Questioning your staff

Although your staff will probably give feedback to a course provider, it’s a good idea to have your own evaluation forms too. We’ve produced an example evaluation template that you can use as a basis for this exercise (see The next step).

What can you ask? You could ask staff questions such as: “How relevant was the training to your job role?”“What were the most and least useful parts of the training?” and “Will you be able to utilise your new skills?”

Tip 1. Ask for feedback promptly. The longer you leave it, the less reliable the results will be.

Tip 2. If you get negative feedback, query it with the provider. Don’t assume your employee approached the course with enthusiasm!

And finally. The Business Link website includes detailed information on how to evaluate training and has a free guide that you can download.

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How to Make an Evaluation Plan

How to Make an Evaluation Plan

1. Determine the evaluation purpose.

An evaluation purpose explains why you are conducting an evaluation. To help shape your evaluation purpose, consider who will use the findings, how they will use them, and what they need to know.

You might use training evaluation findings to:

  • Develop a new training
  • Improve an existing training
  • Provide instructor feedback
  • Determine if your training met the desired outcomes
  • Make decisions about resource allocation
2. Develop the evaluation questions.

Create evaluation questions that match your purpose. Evaluation questions are broad, overarching questions that support your evaluation purpose—they are not specific test or survey questions for learners to answer.
Evaluation questions are often focused in one of two categories: process or outcome.

Process evaluation questions focus on the training itself—things like the content, format, and delivery of the training.

3. Choose the data collection methods.

Choose data collection methods that will help you answer your evaluation questions. Common methods include tests or quizzes, surveys or questionnaires, observation, expert or peer review, and interviews and focus groups. Identify how long it will take to access this data and how often you will collect it. Develop a timeline for when to collect, analyze, and interpret data so that you will have the information ready when you need it.

Keep feasibility in mind when you select data collection methods. The resources, time and effort required in your evaluation plan should match the scope of the training, and should fit within your available resources.

How to Make an Evaluation Plan

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What are the methods of training evaluation?

There’s a long (and we mean long!) list of training evaluation techniques to choose from, and this can be overwhelming. But there are five techniques that are most often trusted by companies today. Some of these techniques are referred to as models, or training evaluation methods, and we’ll use these terms interchangeably.

This method of evaluating training programs might be one of the oldest, but it’s still one of the most well-loved. Why? Because it breaks the evaluation process down into 4 simple levels – or rather, steps. Here’s how it works:

Step 1: Evaluate learners’ reactions to training. This is commonly measured after training. Ask learners to complete a survey about their overall satisfaction with the learning experience.

Step 2: Measure what was learned during training. Use assessments to measure how much knowledge and skills have changed from before to after training.

Step 3: Assess whether or not (and how much) behavior has changed as a result of training. The best way to measure behavior change is through workplace observations and comparing 360-degree reviews from pre- and post-training.

Step 4: The final and most important step is to evaluate the impact of your employee training program on business results. Here, it’s common to measure results like productivity, quality, efficiency, and customer satisfaction ratings.

In modern times, professionals have suggested that this process should actually be reversed. After all, step 4 is the most important one. If you agree with this approach, start by identifying the results you want to achieve, and work backward from there.

Whichever direction you choose to apply the steps toward, the eLearning industry has come to rely on Kirkpatrick’s model for good reason. Its logical, staged approach is easy to apply, and once the evaluation is complete, you’ll have a deep and wide understanding of employee learning during training.