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What is a learnership, who qualifies and what are the requirements, roles and responsibilities of the various parties?

What is a Learnership?

A learnership can be described as a training programme that consists of both theory and practical elements. It offers a way for you to gain work experience, as well as an NQF registered qualification. This relates directly to an occupation or field of work, such as engineering or project management.

All learnerships are managed by Sector Education Training Authorities (SETAs). They were introduced by the government to help prepare learners for the workplace. This is done by providing them with the necessary skills.

How Does it Work?

You need to complete a theoretical course, along with practical training, to graduate. The practical training is done at a workplace and involves hands-on, practical learning under the guidance of a mentor. The theory part is provided by a training provider. During the learnership, you will be formally assessed in the classroom and in the workplace.

Who qualifies for a learnership?

Learnerships are available for those who have completed school, college or learning at other training institutions, or for those who are studying part-time. Unemployed South Africans can participate in a learnership programme if there is an employer who is prepared to provide the required work experience.

What does a learner receive on completion? 

During the Learnership, learners will be required to complete assignments, tasks and practical tests and projects. They will be formally assessed in the classroom and workplace.
If all the assignments are completed successfully, they will be awarded an NQF-registered qualification, which is recognized nationally. They will receive a certificate stating the qualification and the area of skill development.

How to find a Learnership

  • Plan a career path.
  • Identify the Learnership that supports the chosen career path. (The Learnership will share the name of the qualification so the educational institution can advise you.)
  • Find out as much information as possible about the Learnership from the educational institution, online and newspaper advertisements.
  • Look for Learnerships on the Career Planet website.
  • Enquire about the requirements for entering the Learnership.
  • Find an employer willing to provide practical work experience. The college or university offering the theoretical part of the training would be one source of this information. If you are at college already you must talk to the Programme Managers.
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What are skills

Skill is a term that encompasses the knowledge, competencies and abilities to perform operational tasks. Skills are developed through life and work experiences and they can also be learned through study. There are different types of skills and some may be easier to access for some people than others, based on things like dexterity, physical abilities and intelligence.

Skills can also be measured, and levels determined by skill tests. Most jobs require multiple skills, and likewise, some skills will be more useful for certain professions than others.

Examples of Skills

Skills are the expertise or talent needed in order to do a job or task. Job skills allow you to do a particular job and life skills help you through everyday tasks. There are many different types of skills that can help you succeed at all aspects of your life whether it’s school, work, or even a sport or hobby.

Skills are what makes you confident and independent in life and are essential for success. It might take determination and practice, but almost any skill can be learned or improved. Set yourself realistic expectations and goals, get organized and get learning.

A skill is the learned ability to perform an action with determined results with good execution often within a given amount of time, energy, or both. Skills can often be divided into domain-general and domain-specific skills. For example, in the domain of work, some general skills would include time management, teamwork and leadership, self-motivation and others, whereas domain-specific skills would be used only for a certain job. Skill usually requires certain environmental stimuli and situations to assess the level of skill being shown and used.

A skill may be called an art when it represents a body of knowledge or branch of learning, as in the art of medicine or the art of war.[1] Although the arts are also skills, there are many skills that form an art but have no connection to the fine arts. A practice is when the learned skill is put into practice. An art or skill may be the basis for a profession, trade, or craft.

What Is a Skill Set?

A skill set is the combination of knowledge, personal qualities, and abilities that you’ve developed through your life and work. It typically combines two types of skills: soft skills and hard skills.

Soft skills are interpersonal or people skills. They are somewhat difficult to quantify and relate to someone’s personality and ability to work with others. This in-demand skill set includes good communication, listening, attention to detail, critical thinking, empathy, and conflict resolution abilities, among other skills.

Hard skills are quantifiable and teachable. They include the specific technical knowledge and abilities required for a job. Examples of hard skills include computer programming, accounting, mathematics, and data analysis.

How Skill Sets Work

In the workplace, you typically use a range of skills on a given day. Some of these skills are job-specific. For example, hairstylists will use their knowledge of hair-coloring techniques and payroll clerks will use their accounting software skills. You might learn these skills by going to school or through training with an experienced mentor.

You might also use hard skills that aren’t job-specific. For example, you might use your written communication skills to craft an email to follow-up on an important project. You might use your verbal communication skills to present a project idea to a manager.

You might also use soft skills you’ve developed through your work experience, school, and volunteer roles. They might include problem-solving or resolving a conflict with a customer.

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What are the methods of training evaluation?

There’s a long (and we mean long!) list of training evaluation techniques to choose from, and this can be overwhelming. But there are five techniques that are most often trusted by companies today. Some of these techniques are referred to as models, or training evaluation methods, and we’ll use these terms interchangeably.

This method of evaluating training programs might be one of the oldest, but it’s still one of the most well-loved. Why? Because it breaks the evaluation process down into 4 simple levels – or rather, steps. Here’s how it works:

Step 1: Evaluate learners’ reactions to training. This is commonly measured after training. Ask learners to complete a survey about their overall satisfaction with the learning experience.

Step 2: Measure what was learned during training. Use assessments to measure how much knowledge and skills have changed from before to after training.

Step 3: Assess whether or not (and how much) behavior has changed as a result of training. The best way to measure behavior change is through workplace observations and comparing 360-degree reviews from pre- and post-training.

Step 4: The final and most important step is to evaluate the impact of your employee training program on business results. Here, it’s common to measure results like productivity, quality, efficiency, and customer satisfaction ratings.

In modern times, professionals have suggested that this process should actually be reversed. After all, step 4 is the most important one. If you agree with this approach, start by identifying the results you want to achieve, and work backward from there.

Whichever direction you choose to apply the steps toward, the eLearning industry has come to rely on Kirkpatrick’s model for good reason. Its logical, staged approach is easy to apply, and once the evaluation is complete, you’ll have a deep and wide understanding of employee learning during training.